About

Ambrose Seddon is an electroacoustic composer whose outputs include acousmatic music, live electronic music, and multichannel sound installation. His work has been performed internationally in concert and on radio, and has received competition prizes and special mentions. With research interests in compositional structuring processes, form in electroacoustic music, and the analysis of electroacoustic music, he has presented at international conferences and festivals. Originally with a background in electronica and experimental pop music, he continually strives to integrate new and varied approaches into his compositional language.

Ambrose’s work has been internationally awarded and recognised, including: 1st Prize in the Visiones Sonoras Electroacoustic Music Composition Competition, Mexico (2006); European Region Composition Prize at ICMC 2007 (International Computer Music Conference); Special Mention in the Foundation Destellos International Competition of Electroacoustic Composition and Visual-Music (2010); Special Mention in the Métamorphoses 2012 Competition of Acousmatic Composition; and 1st Prize in the international composition competition Klang! Électroacoustique, Montpellier, France (2014).

After completing a BMus Music at Goldsmiths College, University of London, Ambrose composed, produced and performed as a founding member of the band Weevil, with music published by EMI and released on independent record labels. Returning to academic studies he completed an MA in Electroacoustic Composition at City University, London (2004), followed by a PhD in Music (electroacoustic composition, 2013) also at City University, London, both supervised by Prof Denis Smalley. His Doctoral research investigated recurrence in acousmatic music, providing concepts to help rationalise structuring processes within acousmatic music composition. This involved exploring the different ways in which recurrence is manifest within acousmatic works, how sound materials might be related to one another, and the temporal relationships existing among those sounds.

Ambrose is currently Lecturer in Music and Audio Technology at Bournemouth University, UK.